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Tuesday, 24 March 2009

PPP and PML-N, New lines of friendship?

Prime Minister Yousuf Raza Gilani, left, seen with opposition leader Nawaz Sharif, during a press conference after their meeting in Raiwind. — AP
Prime Minister Yousuf Raza Gilani, left, seen with opposition leader Nawaz Sharif, during a press conference after their meeting in Raiwind. — AP



Lines of friendship


Tuesday, March 24, 2009 (The News)

The post-long march shape of the political set up is now beginning to take shape. The possibility of a new era of PPP-PML-N cooperation was laid out at the Raiwind estate of Mian Nawaz Sharif, where PM Yusuf Raza Gilani lunched in considerable style after receiving a quite obviously enthusiastic welcome from PML-N leaders. Mian Nawaz Sharif has however made it clear that any formal arrangement will be possible only after the verdict on the review petition questioning the disqualification of himself and Shahbaz Sharif. The indications are that the PML-N government in Punjab may soon be restored.

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Nawaz Sharif offers cooperation to PPP

* PML-N chief says CoD can be basis for cooperation
* Asks political parties to unite g No grudge with Zardari after promise fulfilled
* PML-N has not decided to join federal govt

By Rana Kashif


LAHORE: Pakistan Muslim League-Nawaz (PML-N) chief Nawaz Sharif offered to cooperate with the Pakistan People’s Party (PPP) led government in a party meeting on Monday.

Addressing the party’s General Council meeting – the second in five weeks – Nawaz repeated his stance that the Charter of Democracy could form a basis for such cooperation.

He urged all political parties to unite to help steer the country out of crises.

“Let us come to sit together and ensure the implementation of the Charter of Democracy, eradicate unemployment and poverty, ensure rule of law, provision of education and health facilities to all and make Pakistan a civilised country,” Nawaz said. All decisions should now be made in parliament, he said.

The PML-N chief said he had no grudge with President Asif Ali Zardari and felt that the promise he had made – to reinstate the sacked judges – had been fulfilled. He said he had consulted leaders of the lawyers movement, the Jamaat-e-Islami and Pakistan Tehrik-e-Insaaf before calling off the long march on March 16.

His brother Shahbaz Sharif praised the media for supporting the movement.

In a TV interview later on Monday, Nawaz said his party had not decided to join the PPP-led federal government and that the restoration of trust in the PPP would take time.



PML-N changes tone on Zardari

LAHORE: The PML-N general council meeting on Monday was quite different from the previous one, with neither the leadership nor the workers using harsh words against the PPP leadership. President Asif Zardari has been severely criticised in the previous meeting. Yesterday however, Javed Hashmi told the participants the PML-N considered Zardari the president despite political differences with him. PML-N leader Sabir Shah told the meeting a joke aimed at the PPP leadership, but Saad Rafiq immediately expunged it from the record. staff report (Daily Express, 24 March 2009)

...

Abbas Ather, Express, 24 March 2009



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Nazir Naji, Jang, 24 March 2009



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PS:


Jang, 24 March 2009

1 comment:

Raazi said...

Reconciliation should be ‘concrete’

Stopping short of any “concrete” agreements, Prime Minister Yousaf Raza Gilani and PMLN leader Mr Nawaz Sharif met at the latter’s residence at Raiwind in Lahore on Sunday and “called for reconciliation to end Pakistan’s political crisis”. It was an off-day for the premier and he was there accompanied by his son, Syed Abdul Qadir. The style should have been to the liking of President Asif Ali Zardari who had sent the PM with a message of reconciliation after the hullabaloo of the Long March in which violent things were said about the PPP government.

Mr Sharif has responded positively to the message, which means he is willing to let bygones be bygones, especially as the government has gone in for a review of the Supreme Court bench decision disqualifying the Sharif brothers; and, because it has also decided to file a separate plea asking the Court to “stay” the bench decision. The content of what Mr Gilani said during the meeting must have been convincing since it elicited a forthright “yes” from Mr Sharif who is clearly putting a lot of his political capital on the line in reciprocating the gesture.

One is compelled to think that Mr Gilani’s assurances about the 17th Amendment and the Charter of Democracy must have been “concrete” enough for Mr Sharif to abandon at least two very strong elements standing behind his party during the Long March. The first element comprises party leaders known as the “hawkish caucus” who would have no truck with the PPP even if it was subjected to an immaculate rebirth. The second element is the Jama’at-e Islami and Tehreek-e Insaf whose workers took the brunt of the “reactive” police violence in Lahore. Mr Sharif must know that if “reconciliation” fails this time too, the Jama’at and Imran Khan will not bite the bait again.

Both parties have got the measure of each other. Although the PMLN has been awarded the garland of victory by Punjab, Mr Sharif has also sensed the limits of how far he can go before the “third force” will move in to stop the show. Also, the people at large are happy that the two big parties have chosen to reconcile instead of fighting in the streets and ruining their businesses. But whether there will a true reconciliation of live and let live remains to be seen. It is easier said than done. There are many problems ahead.

Daily Times, Editorial, 24 March

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